We’re continuing to showcase the athletic training industry through a series of athletic training Q&A features on our blog. From seasoned AT’s to those that are just starting out—there’s advice and insight you can learn from each featured athletic trainer. Read on to learn about Aubrie Carter and what advice she has for those wanting to pursue a career.

How long have you been an athletic trainer and what’s your background in athletic training?

Aubrie Carter: I have been a certified athletic trainer for 8 years working a majority of that time in the collegiate setting at Grand Canyon University with primarily Women’s Indoor Volleyball and Beach Volleyball, secondarily Women’s Basketball and Track & Field. During that time, and currently, I have acted as a preceptor for the ATEP program at GCU and instructed many athletic training and exercise science courses. I made the transition to Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy in the fall of 2017.

Why did you become an athletic trainer?

Aubrie Carter: Sports have always played a large role in my life from the time I was little through college, however I knew that being a professional athlete was not in my career path. In high school I became interested in strength training and overall health and wellness, but learned how important prevention and precise treatment of injuries was which led me to pursue what a degree in athletic training entailed. I also am not the best mathematician and athletic training still allowed me to get a degree without any math skills.

What role does an athletic trainer play for sports teams?

Aubrie Carter: I believe that the role can vary based on the level and environment. The athletic trainer should be a great educator in prevention, knowledgeable in mechanism of injury, and most importantly a great listener. You are an advocate for the athlete! In my experience, being available to listen to needs is where I have found success and been able to lead athletes to success, whether that is keeping them injury free, returning them to play ASAP, or getting them through their next exam or breakup.

Where do you see the profession of athletic training going in the next 5 years?  

Aubrie Carter: I hope to see recognition in the medical profession grow. Athletic trainers have a lot to offer if given the right opportunity.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to pursue athletic training as a career?

Aubrie Carter: As a preceptor for Grand Canyon University, I always tell all my students that being an athletic trainer is not easy. Like many other jobs in the medical profession, being an athletic trainer can mean working lots of hours with minimum pay and minimum recognition. However, when they experience returning their first injured athlete back to the competition it is all worth every hour of time. Some other practical advice I would give: make sure you really understand the role and job description of an Athletic Trainer.  No, it is not personal training, strength training, or a life coach; but it will involve aspects of all three.  The best way to understand this is to start networking and volunteering your time in observation of the profession.

Does athletic training sound like a profession you’d like to pursue? Contact us today, as we’d love to connect with you and further help you achieve your goal of being part of the athletic training industry.

We celebrate athletic trainers everyday here at Foothills, but each March it’s highlighted on a national level during National Athletic Training Month. We are behind this initiative fully, as it helps spread awareness about the important work athletic trainers. Athletic trainers are typically known for working closely with sports teams, but as you read our Q&A with Greg Keuter, MS, ATC, PES, you’ll see they do much more than that.

How long have you been an athletic trainer and what’s your background in athletic training? 

Greg Keuter: I am in my 31st year as a Certified Athletic Trainer. I began my career in 1989 with the Chicago Cubs as a minor league athletic trainer. At that time, I was one of two “athletic trainers” in the Appalachian League. I put athletic trainer in quotes there because by today’s standards, those other individuals would not be allowed to use the title athletic trainer.

 

Why did you become an athletic trainer?

Greg Keuter: I have been a sports nut my entire life I can remember. As my talent began to no longer suffice to allow my continued participation, I began to look for ways to remain close and involved. As I finished my freshman year at the University of Nebraska, I was considering working toward a physical therapy degree when my mother told me about a presentation she had heard from George Sullivan, the Head Athletic Trainer at the University. As she talked, a light bulb went off and I realized athletic training was the career for me.

 

What role does an athletic trainer play for sports teams?

Greg Keuter: First and foremost, athletic trainers work hard to keep active individuals healthy and safe as they take part in an active lifestyle, be that in organized sports, simple play, or just being an active individual. When injuries and illnesses occur, the athletic trainer is often the first responder to assess the situation, provide immediate care, and then to guide the individual back to full participation in the safest way possible.

 

Where do you see the profession of athletic training going in the next 5 years?

Greg Keuter: I am passionate about this profession and I am encouraged by its growth and the increased level of exposure it is enjoying on a national level. I believe that when athletic trainers are seen more as health care providers, and less as personal trainers or equipment managers, the value we bring to health care will become more appreciated and respected. Along with that, the progression to a Masters degree as a minimum requirement for certification will further provide opportunities for the growth of the profession into areas not yet considered.

 

What advice would you give to someone who wants to pursue athletic training as a career?

Greg Keuter: As an athletic trainer, my patient’s well-being is my first priority. My goal is to provide thoughtful, compassionate health care, always respecting the rights, welfare and dignity of others. The athletic trainer does not require, and often does not receive recognition for the effort needed to do this and relies on the fulfillment of seeing those they care for achieve their goals for job satisfaction. It is sometimes difficult work but when all is said and done, I cannot think of a more rewarding career for me. If you are someone who is not allergic to work, does not need constant recognition, and desires to help others be their best, healthiest self, then you should look into becoming a certified athletic trainer. You will be glad you did.

If you’re interested in learning more about athletic training and how we integrate athletic training coverage, visit our website here.

Soccer season is right around the corner, making it the perfect time to announce our new partnership with Phoenix Rising FC. “An affiliation with the Phoenix Rising has been on our radar for some time, and on behalf of the entire Foothills team, we are thrilled to be entering into this partnership,” said Chief Executive Officer Mike Basten, PT, DPT. “Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy has its foundation in working with athletes, both at a professional and amateur level, and we believe this relationship will further our mission to be involved in the community.”

Throughout the 2018 season, Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy will be providing physical therapy and athletic training coverage for the entire Phoenix Rising team. Chief Experience Officer Bruce Watson, PT notes “We welcome the opportunity to partner with the Phoenix Rising Football Club to care for their athletes. We believe physical therapists, athletic trainers, physicians and club leadership working together on injury prevention, athletic performance and recovery from injury is the gold standard, whether for professional or amateur athletes.”

Getting our patients back to doing what they love drives our actions on a daily basis. This is the foundation of why we do what we do as a company and as a profession. However, we believe our efforts extend beyond the walls of our clinics and into the community and we strive to be heavily involved in sports medicine outreach at youth, amateur or professional levels. Here’s to a successful and healthy season for the Phoenix Rising team and our sports medicine partnership.